Patience & Spiced Eggs with My Mama

If you’ve ever tried to peel more than one soft boiled egg, you know what patience/impatience feels like, lol.

 
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For Chinese New Year’s, I was craving these special eggs that my mom used to make a lot when we were kids. She used to put them in huge plastic containers, and we would eat them on the many road trips we took as a family.

I remember eating them in the parking lot of Disneyland, enjoying the heck out of them, but when another (white) family happened to walk past, I would immediately feel embarrassed about eating these weird brown eggs in the car.

Thankfully, as an adult, I just want to be able to re-make them so I can share it with my future kids (if I have them) or at least write it down so it’s kept somewhere.

I think in English, these are called Chinese tea eggs, but in my family, we call them “lo sui dan” (滷水蛋). And below, you’ll see the recipe!

If you make these, my family and I would love to hear how they turned out!

 

You’ll see down below that the measurements of things are pretty much nonexistent/gibberish because that’s how my dad cooks. He’s the one who does most of the cooking at home, and he’s the chef behind the marinade. So gibberish is dad-speak for measurements - “some of this, dash of that, a handful of this.”

Me: “But my hand is way smaller than yours, dad!”

Dad: “Well use two of your hands then!”

LOL.


Chinese Tea Eggs (滷水蛋) Recipe:

 

PART ONE: Cook the eggs.

  1. Take eggs out of the fridge and wait until they’ve warmed up to room temperature.

  2. Place eggs in a pan.

  3. Fill the pan up with water to cover only half of the eggs.

  4. Cover the pan and wait for the water to come up to a boil. About 5 minutes.

  5. Once the water boils, turn off the heat, keep the cover on, and let it sit for at least another 5 minutes.

  6. Take out of the eggs and crack the shell a bit to see if the whites are cooked.

  7. Pour out the hot water and rinse with cold water. If you’re in a hurry, you can also use iced water.

  8. Lightly crack the eggs on the butt side and let them sit in cold water for at least 30 minutes. You want the eggs to be a bit cold to the touch. It makes the peeling process easier.

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“Cracking them on the butt side makes them easier to peel, too.” - Mama Tang

While waiting for the eggs to cool off, you can start on the marinade.

 

PART TWO: Make the marinade.

  1. “Throw some soy sauce into a pot, then add some cooking wine, sugar, a packet of spices from Taiwan (Spice for Spiced Food, lol), and additional spices.” - Papa Tang.

  2. Put the mixture on high heat until the entire thing boils. The longer you boil the mixture, the tastier it gets, for the most part. So boil to taste, pretty much.

 
Spices for Spiced Food - You can find this at most Asian groceries like Ranch 99 or Lion Market.

Spices for Spiced Food - You can find this at most Asian groceries like Ranch 99 or Lion Market.

Same jar, same stuff. Different view.

Same jar, same stuff. Different view.

Dad mixes this bunch himself - there’s dried ginger root, star anise, cumin, chicory, jojoba berries, and bay leaves.

Dad mixes this bunch himself - there’s dried ginger root, star anise, cumin, chicory, jojoba berries, and bay leaves.

This is what the marinade looks like in the pot after boiling.

This is what the marinade looks like in the pot after boiling.

 

Let the marinade cool off until it’s warm to the touch. You can peel the eggs while you wait.

 
 

PART THREE: Soak the eggs.

  1. Add the peeled eggs to the warm or room temperature marinade and let it sit at room temperature for however long it takes for it to "taste good.” The eggs will be brown. :P

  2. “Taste test the eggs at will, hahahaha!: - Mama Tang

  3. Before serving the eggs, you can warm up the sauce and serve it with the eggs as a dipping sauce!

  4. Enjoy, enjoy, enjoy!

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Le finished product :) Yummy!

Le finished product :) Yummy!

Depending on what you like (more hard- or soft-boiled eggs or more bland or tastier eggs), you can always reduce or add more time to any of the steps above.

Depending on what you like (more hard- or soft-boiled eggs or more bland or tastier eggs), you can always reduce or add more time to any of the steps above.

 

Side note: Be sure to save the marinade! You can use it over and over again to marinade any kind of meat you’d like. We keep it in jars in the freezer, and we recommend scraping off the layer of fat on top before using it again. You might want to taste test with each use as the flavors will get weaker.

“If the flavors get weaker, you can add salt, sugar, soy sauce, or any of the spices from above AT WILL.” - Mama Tang

(Mom, you’re watching too many cop shows, la!)

Let us know how you like it!!!

 

 

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